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#21 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:12 AM

OF THE CHARACTERISTICS OF MEN AND WOMEN. THE REASONS WHY WOMEN REJECT THE 
ADDRESSES OF MEN. ABOUT MEN WHO HAVE SUCCESS WITH WOMEN, AND ABOUT WOMEN 
WHO ARE EASILY GAINED OVER 
 
The wives of other people may be resorted to on the occasions already described in Chapter of this 
work, but the possibility of their acquisition, their fitness for cohabitation, the danger to oneself in uniting 
with them, and the future effect of these unions, should first of all be examined. A man may resort to the wife 
of another, for the purpose of saving his own life, when he perceives that his love for her proceeds from one 
the degree of intensity to another. These degrees are ten in number, and are distinguished by the following marks: 
Love of the eye 
Attachment of the mind 
Constant reflection 
Destruction of sleep 
Emaciation of the body 
Turning away from objects of enjoyment 
Removal of shame 
Madness 
Fainting 
Death 
Ancient authors say that a man should know the disposition, truthfulness, purity, and will of a young woman, 
as also the intensity, or weakness of her passions, from the form of her body, and from her characteristic 
marks and signs. But Vatsyayana is of opinion that the forms of bodies, and the characteristic marks or signs 
are but erring tests of character, and that women should be judged by their conduct, by the outward expression 
of their thoughts, and by the movements of their bodies. 
Now as a general rule Gonikaputra says that a woman falls in love with every handsome man she sees, and so 
does every man at the sight of a beautiful woman, but frequently they do not take any further steps, owing to 
various considerations. In love the following circumstances are peculiar to the woman. She loves without 
regard to right or wrong, 1 and does not try to gain over a man simply for the attainment of some particular 
purpose. Moreover, when a man first makes up to her she naturally shrinks from him, even though she may be 
willing to unite herself with him. But when the attempts to gain her are repeated and renewed, she at last 
consents. But with a man, even though he may have begun to love, he conquers his feelings from a regard for 
morality and wisdom, and although his thoughts are often on the woman, he does not yield, even though an 
attempt be made to gain him over. He sometimes makes an attempt or effort to win the object of his 
affections, and having failed, he leaves her alone for the future. In the same way, when a woman is once 
gained, he often becomes indifferent about her. As for the saying that a man does not care for what is easily 
gained, and only desires a thing which cannot be obtained without difficulty, it is only a matter of talk. 
The causes of a woman rejecting the addresses of a man are as follows: 
Affection for her husband 
Desire of lawful progeny 
Want of opportunity 
Anger at being addressed by the man too familiarly 
Difference in rank of life 
Want of certainty on account of the man being devoted travelling 
Thinking that the man may be attached to some other person 
Fear of the man's not keeping his intentions secret 
Thinking that the man is too devoted to his friends, and has too great a regard for them 
The apprehension that he is not in earnest 
Bashfulness on account of his being an illustrious man 
Fear on account of his being powerful, or possessed of too impetuous passion, in the case of the deer woman 
Bashfulness on account of his being too clever 
The thought of having once lived with him on friendly terms only 
Contempt of his want of knowledge of the world 
Distrust of his low character 
Disgust at his want of perception of her love for him 
In the case of an elephant woman, the thought that he is a hare man, or a man of weak passion 
Compassion lest anything should befall him on account of his passion 
Despair at her own imperfections 
Fear of discovery 
Disillusion at seeing his grey hair or shabby appearance 
Fear that he may be employed by her husband to test her chastity 
The thought that he has too much regard for morality 
The causes of a woman rejecting the addresses of a man are as follows: 
Affection for her husband 
Desire of lawful progeny 
Want of opportunity 
Anger at being addressed by the man too familiarly 
Difference in rank of life 
Want of certainty on account of the man being devoted travelling 
Thinking that the man may be attached to some other person 
Fear of the man's not keeping his intentions secret 
Thinking that the man is too devoted to his friends, and has too great a regard for them 
The apprehension that he is not in earnest 
Bashfulness on account of his being an illustrious man 
Fear on account of his being powerful, or possessed of too impetuous passion, in the case of the deer woman 
Bashfulness on account of his being too clever 
The thought of having once lived with him on friendly terms only 
Contempt of his want of knowledge of the world 
Distrust of his low character 
Disgust at his want of perception of her love for him 
In the case of an elephant woman, the thought that he is a hare man, or a man of weak passion 
Compassion lest anything should befall him on account of his passion 
Despair at her own imperfections 
Fear of discovery 
Disillusion at seeing his grey hair or shabby appearance 
Fear that he may be employed by her husband to test her chastity 
The thought that he has too much regard for morality 
Whichever of the above causes a man may detect, he should endeavour to remove it from the very beginning. 
Thus, the bashfulness that may arise from his greatness or his ability, he should remove by showing his great 
love and affection for her. The difficulty of the want of opportunity, or of his inaccessibility, he should 
remove by showing her some easy way of access. The excessive respect entertained by the woman for him should be removed by making himself very familiar. The difficulties that arise from his being thought a low 
character he should remove by showing his valour and his wisdom; those that come from neglect by extra 
attention; and those that arise from fear by giving her proper encouragement. 
The following are the men who generally obtain success with women: 
Men well versed in the science of love 
Men skilled in telling stories 
Men acquainted with women from their childhood Men 
who have secured their confidence 
Men who send presents to them 
Men who talk well 
Men who do things that they like 
Men who have not loved other women previously 
Men who act as messengers 
Men who know their weak points 
Men who are desired by good women 
Men who are united with their female friends 
Men who are good looking 
Men who have been brought up with them 
Men who are their neighbours 
Men who are devoted to sexual pleasures, even though these be with their own servants 
The lovers of the daughters of their nurse 
Men who have been lately married 
Men who like picnics and pleasure parties 
Men who are liberal 
Men who are celebrated for being very strong (Bull men) 
Enterprising and brave men 
Men who surpass their husbands in learning and good looks, in good qualities, and in liberality 
Men whose dress and manner of living are magnificent 
The following are the women who are easily gained over: 
Women who stand at the doors of their houses 
Women who are always looking out on the street 
Women who sit conversing in their neighbour's house 
A woman who is always staring at you 
A female messenger 
A woman who looks sideways at you 
A woman whose husband has taken another wife without any just cause 
A woman who hates her husband, or who is hated by him 
A woman who has nobody to look after her, or keep her in check 
A woman who has not had any children 
A woman whose family or caste is not well known 
A woman whose children are dead 
A woman who is very fond of society 
A woman who is apparently very affectionate with her husband 
The wife of an actor 
A widow 
A poor woman 
A woman fond of enjoyments 
The wife of a man with many younger brothers 
A vain woman 
A woman whose husband is inferior to her in rank or abilities 
A woman who is proud of her skill in the arts 
A woman disturbed in mind by the folly of her husband 
A woman who has been married in her infancy to a rich man, and not liking him when she grows up, desires a 
man possessing a disposition, talents, and wisdom suitable to her own tastes. 
A woman who is slighted by her husband without any cause 
A woman who is not respected by other women of the same rank or beauty as herself 
A woman whose husband is devoted to travelling 
The wife of a jeweller 
A jealous woman 
A covetous woman 
An immoral woman 
A barren woman 
A lazy woman 
A cowardly woman 
A humpbacked woman 
A dwarfish woman 
A deformed woman 
A vulgar woman 
An ill-smelling woman 
A sick woman 
An old woman 
There are also two verses on the subject as follows: 
'Desire, which springs from nature, and which is increased by art, and from which all danger is taken away by 
wisdom, becomes firm and secure. A clever man, depending on his own ability, and observing carefully the 
ideas and thoughts of women, and removing the causes of their turning away from men, is generally 
successful with them.'

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#22 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:15 AM

ABOUT MAKING ACQUAINTANCE WITH THE WOMAN, AND OF THE EFFORTS TO GAIN HER 
OVER 
 
ANCIENT authors are of opinion that girls are not so easily seduced by employing female messengers as by 
the efforts of the man himself, but that the wives of others are more easily got at by the aid of female 
messengers than by the personal efforts of the man. But Vatsyayana lays it down that whenever it is possible a 
man should always act himself in these matters, and it is only when such is impracticable, or impossible, that 
female messengers should be employed. As for the saying that women who act and talk boldly and freely are 
to be won by the personal efforts of the man, and that women who do not possess those qualities are to be got 
at by female messengers, it is only a matter of talk. 
Now when a man acts himself in the matter he should first of all make the acquaintance of the woman he 
loves in the following manner: 
He should arrange to be seen by the woman either on a natural or special opportunity. A natural opportunity is 
when one of them goes to the house of the other, and a special opportunity is when they meet either at the 
house of a friend, or a caste-fellow, or a minister, or a physician, as also on the occasion of marriage 
ceremonies, sacrifices, festivals, funerals, and garden parties. 
When they do meet, the man should be careful to look at her in such a way as to cause the state of his mind to 
be made known to her; he should pull about his moustache, make a sound with his nails, cause his own 
ornaments to tinkle, bite his lower lip, and make various other signs of that description. When she is looking 
at him he should speak to his friends about her and other women, and should show to her his liberality and his 
appreciation of enjoyments. When sitting by the side of a female friend he should yawn and twist his body, 
contract his eyebrows, speak very slowly as if he was weary, and listen to her indifferently. A conversation 
having two meanings should also be carried on with a child or some other person, apparently having regard to 
a third person, but really having reference to the woman he loves, and in this way his love should be made 
manifest under the pretext of referring to others rather than to herself. He should make marks that have 
reference to her, on the earth with his nails, or with a stick, and should embrace and kiss a child in her 
presence, and give it the mixture of betel nut and betel leaves with his tongue, and press its chin with his 
fingers in a caressing way. All these things should be done at the proper time and in proper places. 
The man should fondle a child that may be sitting on her lap, and give it something to play with, and also take 
the same back again. Conversation with respect to the child may also be held with her, and in this manner he 
should gradually become well acquainted with her, and he should also make himself agreeable to her 
relations. Afterwards, this acquaintance should be made a pretext for visiting her house frequently, and on 
such occasions he should converse on the subject of love in her absence but within her hearing. As his 
intimacy with her increases he should place in her charge some kind of deposit or trust, and take away from it 
a small portion at a time; or he may give her some fragrant substances, or betel nuts to be kept for him by her. 
After this he should endeavour to make her well acquainted with his own wife, and get them to carry on 
confidential conversations, and to sit together in lonely places. In order to see her frequently he should arrange 
so that the same goldsmith, the same jeweller, the same basket maker, the same dyer, and the same 
washerman should be employed by the two families. And he should also pay her long visits openly under the 
pretence of being engaged with her on business, and one business should lead to another, so as to keep up the 
intercourse between them. Whenever she wants anything, or is in need of money, or wishes to acquire skill in 
one of the arts, he should cause her to understand that he is willing and able to do anything that she wants, to 
give her money, or teach her one of the arts, all these things being quite within his ability and power. In the 
same way he should hold discussions with her in company with other people, and they should talk of the 
doings and sayings of other persons, and examine different things, like jewellery, precious stones, etc. On 
such occasions he should show her certain things with the values of which she may be unacquainted, and if she begins to dispute with him about the things or their value, he should not contradict her, but point out that 
he agrees with her in every way. 
Thus end the ways of making the acquaintance of woman desired. 
Now after a girl has become acquainted with the man as above described, and has manifested her love to him 
by the various outward signs and by the motions of her body, the man should make every effort to gain her 
over. But as girls are not acquainted with sexual union, they should be treated with the greatest delicacy, and 
the man should proceed with considerable caution, though in the case of other women, accustomed to sexual 
intercourse, this is not necessary. When the intentions of the girl are known, and her bashfulness put aside, the 
man should begin to make use of her money, and an interchange of clothes, flowers should be made. In this 
the man should take particular care that the things given by him are handsome and valuable. He should 
moreover receive from her a mixture of betel nut and betel leaves, and when he is going to a party he should 
ask for the flower in her hair, or for the flower in her hand. If he himself gives her a flower it should be a 
sweet smelling one, and marked with marks made by his nails or teeth. With increasing assiduity he should 
dispel her fears, and by degrees get her to go with him to some lonely place, and there he should embrace and 
kiss her. And finally at the time of giving her some betel nut, or of receiving the same from her, or at the time 
of making an exchange of flowers, he should touch and press her private parts, thus bringing his efforts to a 
satisfactory conclusion. 
When a man is endeavouring to seduce one woman, he should not attempt to seduce any other at the same 
time. But after he has succeeded with the first, and enjoyed her for a considerable time, he can keep her 
affections by giving her presents that she likes, and then commence making up to another woman. When a 
man sees the husband of a woman going to some place near his house, he should not enjoy the woman then, 
even though she may be easily gained over at that time. A wise man having a regard for his reputation should 
not think of seducing a woman who is apprehensive, timid, not to be trusted, well guarded, or possessed of a 
father-in-law, or mother-in-law.


#23 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:17 AM

EXAMINATION OF THE STATE OF A WOMAN'S MIND 
 
WHEN a man is trying to gain over a woman he should examine the state of her mind, and act as follows: 
If she listens to him, but does not manifest to him in any way her own intentions, he should then try to gain 
her over by means of a go-between. 
If she meets him once, and again comes to meet him better dressed than before, or comes to him in some 
lonely place, he should be certain that she is capable of being enjoyed by the use of a little force. A woman 
who lets a man make up to her, but does not give herself up, even after a long time, should be considered as a 
trifler in love, but owing to the fickleness of the human mind, even such a woman can be conquered by always 
keeping up a close acquaintance with her. 
When a woman avoids the attentions of a man, and on account of respect for him, and pride in herself, will not 
meet him or approach him, she can be gained over with difficulty, either by endeavouring to keep on familiar 
terms with her, or else by an exceedingly clever go-between. 
When a man makes up to a woman, and she reproaches him with harsh words, she should be abandoned at 
once. 
When a woman reproaches a man, but at the same time acts affectionately towards him, she should be made 
love to in every way. 
A woman, who meets a man in lonely places, and puts up with the touch of his foot, but pretends, on account 
of the indecision of her mind, not to be aware of it, should be conquered by patience, and by continued efforts 
as follows: 
If she happens to go to sleep in his vicinity he should put his left arm round her, and see when she awakes 
whether she repulses him in reality, or only repulses him in such a way as if she was desirous of the same 
thing being done to her again. And what is done by the arm can also be done by the foot. If the man succeeds 
in this point he should embrace her more closely, and if she will not stand the embrace and gets up, but 
behaves with him as usual the next day, he should consider then that she is not unwilling to be enjoyed by 
him. If however she does not appear again, the man should try to get over her by means of a go-between; and 
if, after having disappeared for some time, she again appears, and behaves with him as usual, the man should 
then consider that she would not object to be united with him. 
When a woman gives a man an opportunity, and makes her own love manifest to him, he should proceed to 
enjoy her. And the signs of a woman manifesting her love are these: 
She calls out to a man without being addressed by him in the first instance. 
She shows herself to him in secret places. 
She speaks to him tremblingly and inarticulately. 
She has the fingers of her hand, and the toes of her feet moistened with perspiration, and her face blooming 
with delight. 
She occupies herself with shampooing his body and pressing his head. 
his body. 
She remains with both hands placed on his body motionless as if she had been surprised by something, or was 
overcome by fatigue. 
She sometimes bends down her face upon his thighs and, when asked to shampoo them does not manifest any 
unwillingness to do so. 
She places one of her hands quite motionless on his body, and even though the man should press it between 
two members of his body, she does not remove it for a long time. 
Lastly, when she has resisted all the efforts of the man to gain her over, she returns to him next day to 
shampoo his body as before. 
When a woman neither gives encouragement to a man, nor avoids him, but hides herself and remains in some 
lonely place, she must be got at by means of the female servant who may be near her. If when called by the 
man she acts in the same way, then she should be gained over by means of a skilful go-between. But if she 
will have nothing to say to the man, he should consider well about her before he begins any further attempts to 
gain her over. 
Thus ends the examination of the state of a woman's mind. 
A man should first get himself introduced to a woman, and then carry on a conversation with her. He should 
give her hints of his love for her, and if he finds from her replies that she receives these hints favourably, he 
should then set to work to gain her over without any fear. A woman who shows her love by outward signs to 
the man at his first interview should be gained over very easily. In the same way a lascivious woman, who 
when addressed in loving words replies openly in words expressive of her love, should be considered to have 
been gained over at that very moment. With regard to all women, whether they be wise, simple, or confiding, 
this rule is laid down that those who make an open manifestation of their love are easily gained over


#24 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:18 AM

ABOUT THE BUSINESS OF A GO-BETWEEN
 
IF a woman has manifested her love or desire, either by signs or by motions of the body, and is afterwards 
rarely or never seen anywhere, or if a woman is met for the first time, the man should get a go-between to 
approach her. 
Now the go-between, having wheedled herself into the confidence of the woman by acting according to her 
disposition, should try to make her hate or despise her husband by holding artful conversations with her, by 
telling her about medicines for getting children, by talking to her about other people, by tales of various kinds, 
by stories about the wives of other men, and by praising her beauty, wisdom, generosity and good nature, and 
then saying to her: 'It is indeed a pity that you, who are so excellent a woman in every way, should be 
possessed of a husband of this kind. Beautiful lady, he is not fit even to serve you.' The go-between should 
further talk to the woman about the weakness of the passion of her husband, his jealousy, his roguery, his 
ingratitude, his aversion to enjoyments, his dullness, his meanness, and all the other faults that he may have, 
and with which she may be acquainted. She should particularly harp upon that fault or that failing by which 
the wife may appear to be the most affected. If the wife be a deer woman, and the husband a hare man, then 
there would be no fault in that direction, but in the event of his being a hare man, and she a mare woman or 
elephant woman, then this fault should be pointed out to her. 
Gonikaputra is of opinion that when it is the first affair of the woman, or when her love has only been very 
secretly shown, the man should then secure and send to her a go-between, with whom she may be already 
acquainted, and in whom she confides. 
But to return to our subject. The go-between should tell the woman about the obedience and love of the man, 
and as her confidence and affection increase, she should then explain to her the thing to be accomplished in 
the following way. 'Hear this, Oh beautiful lady, that this man, born of a good family, having seen you, has 
gone mad on your account. The poor young man, who is tender by nature, has never been distressed in such a 
way before, and it is highly probable that he will succumb under his present affliction, and experience the 
pains of death.' If the woman listens with a favourable ear, then on the following day the go-between, having 
observed marks of good spirits in her face, in her eyes, and in her manner of conversation, should again 
converse with her on the subject of the man, and should tell her the stories of Ahalya 1 and Indra, of 
Sakoontala 2 and Dushyanti, and such others as may be fitted for the occasion. She should also describe to her 
the strength of the man, his talents, his skill in the sixty-four sorts of enjoyments mentioned by Babhravya, his 
good looks, and his liaison with some praiseworthy woman, no matter whether this last ever took place or not. 
In addition to this, the go-between should carefully note the behaviour of the woman, which if favourable 
would be as follows: She would address her with a smiling look, would seat herself close beside her, and ask 
her, 'Where have you been? What have you been doing? Where did you dine? Where did you sleep? Where 
have you been sitting?' Moreover, the woman would meet the go-between in lonely places and tell her stories 
there, would yawn contemplatively, draw long sighs, give her presents, remember her on occasions of 
festivals, dismiss her with a wish to see her again, and say to her jestingly, 'Oh, well-speaking woman, why do 
you speak these bad words to me?', would discourse on the sin of her union with the man, would not tell her 
about any previous visits or conversations that she may have had with him, but wish to be asked about these, 
and lastly would laugh at the man's desire, but would not reproach him in any way. 
Thus ends the behaviour of the woman with the go-between. 
When the woman manifests her love in the manner above described, the go-between should increase it by 
bringing to her love tokens from the man. But if the woman be not acquainted with the man personally, the 
go-between should win her over by extolling and praising his good qualities, and by telling stories about his love for her. Here Auddalaka says that when a man or woman are not personally acquainted with each other, 
and have not shown each other any signs of affection, the employment of a go-between is useless. 
The followers of Babhravya on the other hand affirm that even though they be personally unacquainted, but 
have shown each other signs of affection there is an occasion for the employment of a go-between. 
Gonikaputra asserts that a go-between should be employed, provided they are acquainted with each other, 
even though no signs of affection may have passed between them. Vatsyayana however lays it down that even 
though they may not be personally acquainted with each other, and may not have shown each other any signs 
of affection, still they are both capable of placing confidence in a go-between. 
Now the go-between should show the woman the presents, such as the betel nut and betel leaves, the 
perfumes, the flowers, and the rings which the man may have given to her for the sake of the woman, and on 
these presents should be impressed the marks of the man's teeth, and nails, and other signs. On the cloth that 
he may send he should draw with saffron both his hands joined together as if in earnest entreaty. 
The go-between should also show to the woman ornamental figures of various kinds cut in leaves, together 
with ear ornaments, and chaplets made of flowers containing love letters expressive of the desire of the man, 3 
and she should cause her to send affectionate presents to the man in return. After they have mutually accepted 
each other's presents, then a meeting should be arranged between them on the faith of the go-between. 
The followers of Babhravya say that this meeting should take place at the time of going to the temple of a 
Deity, or on occasions of fairs, garden parties, theatrical performances, marriages, sacrifices, festivals and 
funerals, as also at the time of going to the river to bathe, or at times of natural calamities, 4 fear of robbers or 
hostile invasions of the country. 
Gonikaputra is of opinion however that these meetings had better be brought about in the abodes of female 
friends, mendicants, astrologers, and ascetics. But Vatsyayana decides that that place is only well suited for 
the purpose which has proper means of ingress and egress, and where arrangements have been made to 
prevent any accidental occurrence, and when a man who has once entered the house can also leave it at the 
proper time without any disagreeable encounter. 
Now go-betweens or female messengers are of the following different kinds: 
A go-between who takes upon herself the whole burden of the business 
A go-between who does only a limited part of the business 
A go-between who is the bearer of a letter only 
A go-between acting on her own account 
The go-between of an innocent young woman 
A wife serving as a go-between 
A mute go-between 
A go-between who acts the part of the wind 
A woman who, having observed the mutual passion of a man and woman, brings them together and arranges it 
by the power of her own intellect, such a one is called a go-between who takes upon herself the whole burden 
of the business. This kind of go-between is chiefly employed when the man and the woman are already is always done in all other cases) but by the woman also. The above name is also given to a go-between who, 
perceiving that the man and the woman are suited to each other, tries to bring about a union between them, 
even though they be not-acquainted with each other. 
A go-between who, perceiving that some part of the affair is already done, or that the advances on the part of 
the man are already made, completes the rest of the business, is called a go-between who performs only a 
limited part of the business. 
A go-between who simply carries messages between a man and a woman, who love each other, but who 
cannot frequently meet, is called the bearer of a letter or message. 
This name is also given to one who is sent by either of the lovers to acquaint either the one or the other with 
the time and place of their meeting. 
A woman who goes herself to a man, and tells him of her having enjoyed sexual union with him in a dream, 
and expresses her anger at his wife having rebuked him for calling her by the name of her rival instead of by 
her own name, and gives him something bearing the marks of her teeth and nails and informs him that she 
knew she was formerly desired by him, and asks him privately whether she or his wife is the best looking, 
such a person is called a woman who is a go-between for herself. Now such a woman should be met and 
interviewed by the man in private and secretly. 
The above name is also given to a woman who having made an agreement with some other woman to act as 
her go-between, gains over the man to herself, by the means of making him personally acquainted with 
herself, and thus causes the other woman to fail. The same applies to a man who, acting as a go-between for 
another, and having no previous connection with the woman, gains her over for himself, and thus causes the 
failure of the other man. 
A woman who has gained the confidence of the innocent young wife of any man, and who has learned her 
secrets without exercising any pressure on her mind, and found out from her how her husband behaves to her, 
if this woman then teaches her the art of securing his favour, and decorates her so as to show her love, and 
instructs her how and when to be angry, or to pretend to be so, and then, having herself made marks of the 
nails and teeth on the body of the wife, gets the latter to send for her husband to show these marks to him, and 
thus excite him for enjoyment, such is called the go-between of an innocent young woman. In such cases the 
man should send replies to his wife through the same woman. 
When a man gets his wife to gain the confidence of a woman whom he wants to enjoy, and to call on her and 
talk to her about the wisdom and ability of her husband, that wife is called a wife serving as a go-between. In 
this case the feelings of the woman with regard to the man should also be made known through the wife. 
When any man sends a girl or a female servant to any woman under some pretext or other, and places a letter 
in her bouquet of flowers, or in her ear ornaments, or marks something about her with his teeth or nails, that 
girl or female servant is called a mute go-between. In this case the man should expect an answer from the 
woman through the same person. 
A person, who carries a message to a woman, which has a double meaning, or which relates to some past 
transactions, or which is unintelligible to other people, is called a go-between who acts the part of the wind. In 
this case the reply should be asked for through the same woman. 
Thus end the different kinds of go-betweens. 
A female astrologer, a female servant, a female beggar, or a female artist are well acquainted with the business of a go-between, and very soon gain the confidence of other women. Any one of them can raise 
enmity between any two persons if she wishes to do so, or extol the loveliness of any woman that she wishes 
to praise, or describe the arts practised by other women in sexual union. They can also speak highly of the 
love of a man, of his skill in sexual enjoyment, and of the desire of other women, more beautiful even than the 
woman they are addressing, for him, and explain the restraint under which he may be at home. 
Lastly a go-between can, by the artfulness of her conversation, unite a woman with a man even though he may 
not have been thought of by her, or may have been considered beyond her aspirations. She can also bring back 
a man to a woman, who, owing to some cause or other, has separated himself from her.


#25 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:20 AM

ABOUT THE LOVE OF PERSONS IN AUTHORITY FOR THE WIVES OF OTHER MEN 
 
KINGS and their ministers have no access to the abodes of others, and moreover their mode of living is 
constantly watched and observed and imitated by the people at large, just as the animal world, seeing the sun 
rise, get up after him, and when he sits in the evening, lie down again in the same way. Persons in authority 
should not therefore do any improper act in public, as such are impossible from their position, and would be 
deserving of censure. But if they find that such an act is necessary to be done, they should make use of the 
proper means as described in the following paragraphs. 
The head man of the village, the king's officer employed there, and the man 1 whose business it is to glean 
corn, can gain over female villagers simply by asking them. It is on this account that this class of woman are 
called unchaste women by voluptuaries. 
The union of the above mentioned men with this class of woman takes place on the occasions of unpaid 
labour, of filling the granaries in their houses, of taking things in and out of the house, of cleaning the houses, 
of working in the fields, and of purchasing cotton, wool, flax, hemp, and thread, and at the season of the 
purchase, sale, and exchange of various other articles, as well as at the time of doing various other works. In 
the same way the superintendents of cow pens enjoy the women in the cow pens; and the officers, who crave 
the superintendence of widows, of the women who are without supporters, and of women who have left their 
husbands, have sexual intercourse with these women. The intelligent accomplish their object by wandering at 
night in the village, and while villagers also unite with the wives of their sons, being much alone with them. 
Lastly the superintendents of markets have a great deal to do with the female villagers at the time of their 
making purchases in the market. 
During the festival of the eighth moon, i.e. during the bright half of the month of Nargashirsha, as also during 
the moonlight festival of the month of Kartika, and the spring festival of Chaitra, the women of cities and 
towns generally visit the women of the king's harem in the royal palace. These visitors go to the several 
apartments of the women of the harem, as they are acquainted with them, and pass the night in conversation, 
and in proper sports, and amusement, and go away in the morning. On such occasions a female attendant of 
the king (previously acquainted with the woman whom the king desires) should loiter about, and accost this 
woman when she sets out to go home, and induce her to come and see the amusing things in the palace. 
Previous to these festivals even, she should have caused it to be intimated to this woman that on the occasion 
of this festival she would show her all the interesting things in the royal palace. Accordingly she should show 
her the bower of the coral creeper, the garden house with its floor inlaid with precious stones, the bower of 
grapes, the building on the water, the secret passages in the walls of the palace, the pictures, the sporting 
animals, the machines, the birds, and the cages of the lions and the tigers. After this, when alone with her, she 
should tell her about the love of the king for her, and should describe to her the good fortune which would 
attend upon her union with the king, giving her at the time a strict promise of secrecy. If the woman does not 
accept the offer, she should conciliate and please her with handsome presents befitting the position of the 
king, and having accompanied her for some distance should dismiss her with great affection. 
Or, having made the acquaintance of the husband of the woman whom the king desires, the wives of the king 
should get the wife to pay them a visit in the harem, and on this occasion a female attendant of the king, 
having been sent thither, should act as above described. 
Or, one of the king's wives should get acquainted with the woman that the king desires, by sending one of the 
female attendants to her, who should, on their becoming more intimate, induce her to come and see the royal 
abode. Afterwards when she has visited the harem, and acquired confidence, a female confidante of the king, 
sent thither, should act as before described. 
Or, the king's wife should invite the woman, whom the king desires, to come to the royal palace, so that she 
might see the practice of the art in which the king's wife may be skilled, and after she has come to the harem, 
a female attendant of the king, sent thither, should act as before described. 
Or, a female beggar, in league with the king's wife, should say to the woman desired by the king, and whose 
husband may have lost his wealth, or may have some cause of fear from the king: 'This wife of the king has 
influence over him, and she is, moreover, naturally kind-hearted, we must therefore go to her in this matter. I 
shall arrange for your entrance into the harem, and she will do away with all cause of danger and fear from the 
king.' If the woman accepts this offer, the female beggar should take her two or three times to the harem, and 
the king's wife there should give her a promise of protection. After this, when the woman, delighted with her 
reception and promise of protection, again goes to the harem, then a female attendant of the king, sent thither, 
should act as directed. 
What has been said above regarding the wife of one who has some cause of fear from the king applies also to 
the wives of those who seek service under the king, or who are oppressed by the king's ministers, or who are 
poor, or who are not satisfied with their position, or who are desirous of gaining the king's favour, or who 
wish to become famous among the people, or who are oppressed by the members of their own caste, or who 
want to injure their caste fellows, or who are spies of the king, or who have any other object to attain. 
Lastly, if the woman desired by the king be living with some person who is not her husband, then the king 
should cause her to be arrested, and having made her a slave, on account of her crime, should place her in the 
harem. Or the king should cause his ambassador to quarrel with the husband of the woman desired by him, 
and should then imprison her as the wife of an enemy of the king, and by this means should place her in the 
harem
Thus end the means of gaining over the wives of others secretly. 
The above mentioned ways of gaining over the wives of other men are chiefly practised in the palaces of 
kings. But a king should never enter the abode of another person, for Abhira, 2 the king of the Kottas, was 
killed by a washerman while in the house of another, and in the same way Jayasana, the king of the Kashis, 
was slain by the commandant of his cavalry. 
But according to the customs of some countries there are facilities for kings to make love to the wives of other 
men. Thus in the country of the Andhras 3 the newly married daughters of the people thereof enter the king's 
harem with some presents on the tenth day of their marriage, and having been enjoyed by the king are then 
dismissed. In the country of the Vatsagulmas 4 the wives of the chief ministers approach the king at night to 
serve him. In the country of the Vaidarbhas 5 the beautiful wives of the inhabitants pass a month in the king's 
harem under the pretence of affection for the king. In the country of the Aparatakas 6 the people gave their 
beautiful wives as presents to the ministers and the kings. And lastly in the country of the Saurashtras 7 the 
women of the city and the country enter the royal harem for the king's pleasure either together or separately. 
There are also two verses on the subject as follows: 
'The above and other ways are the means employed in different countries by kings with regard to the wives of 
other persons. But a king, who has the welfare of his people at heart, should not on any account put them into 
practice.' 
'A king, who has conquered the 8 enemies of mankind, becomes the master of the whole earth.'


#26 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:22 AM

OF THE CAUSES OF A COURTESAN RESORTING TO MEN; OF THE MEANS OF ATTACHING TO 
HERSELF THE MAN DESIRED; AND OF THE KIND OF MAN THAT IT IS DESIRABLE TO BE 
ACQUAINTED WITH 
 
when a courtesan takes up with a man from love, the action is natural; but when she resorts to him for the 
purpose of getting money, her action is artificial or forced. Even in the latter case, however, she should 
conduct herself as if her love were indeed natural, because men repose their confidence on those women who 
apparently love them. In making known her love to the man, she should show an entire freedom from avarice, 
and for the sake of her future credit she should abstain from acquiring money from him by unlawful means. 
A courtesan, well dressed and wearing her ornaments, should sit or stand at the door of her house, and, 
without exposing herself too much, should look on the public road so as to be seen by the passers by, she 
being like an object on view for sale. She should form friendships with such persons as would enable her to 
separate men from other women, and attach them to herself, to repair her own misfortunes, to acquire wealth, 
and to protect her from being bullied, or set upon by persons with whom she may have dealings of some kind 
or another. 
These persons are: 
The guards of the town, or the police 
The officers of the courts of justice 
Astrologers 
Powerful men, or men with interest 
Learned men 
Teachers of the sixty-four arts 
Pithamardas or confidants 
Vitas or parasites 
Vidushakas or jesters 
Flower sellers 
Perfumers 
Vendors of spirits 
Washermen 
Barbers 
Beggars 
And such other persons as may be found necessary for the particular object to be acquired. 
The following kinds of men may be taken up with, simply for the purpose of getting their money: 
Men of independent income 
Young men 
Men who are free from any ties 
Men who hold places of authority under the king 
Men who have secured their means of livelihood without difficulty 
Men possessed of unfailing sources of income 
Men who consider themselves handsome 
Men who are always praising themselves 
One who is a eunuch, but wishes to be thought a man 
One who hates his equals One who is naturally liberal 
One who has influence with the king or his ministers 
One who is always fortunate 
One who is proud of his wealth 
One who disobeys the orders of his elders 
One upon whom the members of his caste keep an eye 
An only son whose father is wealthy 
An ascetic who is internally troubled with desire 
A brave man 
A physician of the king 
Previous acquaintances 
On the other hand, those who are possessed of excellent qualities are to be resorted to for the sake of love, and 
fame. Such men are as follows: 
Men of high birth, learned, with a good knowledge of the world, and doing the proper things at the proper 
times, poets, good story tellers, eloquent men, energetic men, skilled in various arts, far-seeing into the future, 
possessed of great minds, full of perseverance, of a firm devotion, free from anger, liberal, affectionate to their 
parents, and with a liking for all social gatherings, skilled in completing verses begun by others and in various 
other sports, free from all disease, possessed of a perfect body, strong, and not addicted to drinking, powerful in sexual enjoyment, sociable, showing love towards women and attracting their hearts to himself, but not 
entirely devoted to them, possessed of independent means of livelihood, free from envy, and last of all, free 
from suspicion. 
Such are the good qualifies of a man. 
The woman also should have the following characteristics: 
She should be possessed of beauty, and amiability, with auspicious body marks. She should have a liking for 
good qualifies in other people, as also a liking for wealth. She should take delight in sexual unions, resulting 
from love, and should be of a firm mind, and of the same class as the man with regard to sexual enjoyment. 
She should always be anxious to acquire and obtain experience and knowledge, be free from avarice, and 
always have a liking for social gatherings, and for the arts. 
The following are the ordinary qualities of all women: 
To be possessed of intelligence, good disposition, and good manners; to be straightforward in behaviour, and 
to be grateful; to consider well the future before doing anything; to possess activity, to be of consistent 
behaviour, and to have a knowledge of the proper times and places for doing things; to speak always without 
meanness, loud laughter, malignity, anger, avarice, dullness, or stupidity; to have a knowledge of the Kama 
Sutra, and to be skilled in all the arts connected with it. 
The faults of women are to be known by the absence of any of the above mentioned good qualities. 
The following kinds of men are not fit to be resorted to by courtesans: 
One who is consumptive; one who is sickly; one whose mouth contains worms; one whose breath smells like 
human excrement; one whose wife is dear to him; one who speaks harshly; one who is always suspicious; one 
who is avaricious; one who is pitiless; one who is a thief; one who is self-conceited; one who has a liking for 
sorcery; one who does not care for respect or disrespect; one who can be gained over even by his enemies by 
means of money; and lastly, one who is extremely bashful. 
Ancient authors are of opinion that the causes of a courtesan resorting to men are love, fear, money, pleasure, 
returning some act of enmity, curiosity, sorrow, constant intercourse, Dharma, celebrity, compassion, the 
desire of having a friend, shame, the likeness of the man to some beloved person, the search after good 
fortune, the getting rid of the love of somebody else, the being of the same class as the man with respect to 
sexual union, living in the same place, constancy, and poverty. But Vatsyayana decides that desire of wealth, 
freedom from misfortune, and love are the only causes that affect the union of courtesans with men. 
Now a courtesan should not sacrifice money to her love, because money is the chief thing to be attended to. 
But in cases of fear, etc., she should pay regard to strength and other qualities. Moreover, even though she be 
invited by any man to join him, she should not at once consent to a union, because men are apt to despise 
things which are easily acquired. On such occasions she should first send the shampooers, and the singers, and 
the jesters, who may be in her service, or, in their absence the Pithamardas, or confidants, and others, to find 
out the state of his feelings, and the condition of his mind. By means of these persons she should ascertain 
whether the man is pure or impure, affected, or the reverse, capable of attachment, or indifferent, liberal or 
niggardly; and if she finds him to her liking, she should then employ the Vita and others to attach his mind to 
her
Accordingly, the Pithamarda should bring the man to her house, under the pretence of seeing the fights of 
quails, cocks, and rams, of hearing the mania (a kind of starling) talk, or of seeing some other spectacle, or the practice of some art; or he may take the woman to the abode of the man. After this, when the man comes to 
her house the woman should give him something capable of producing curiosity, and love in his heart, such as 
an affectionate present, telling him that it was specially designed for his use. She should also amuse him for a 
long time by telling him such stories, and doing such things as he may take most delight in. When he goes 
away she should frequently send to him a female attendant, skilled in carrying on a jesting conversation, and 
also a small present at the same time. She should also sometimes go to him herself under the pretence of some 
business, and accompanied by the Pithamarda. 
Thus end the means of attaching to herself the man desired. 
There are also some verses on the subject as follows: 
'When a lover comes to her abode, a courtesan should give him a mixture of betel leaves and betel nut, 
garlands of flowers, and perfumed ointments, and, showing her skill in arts, should entertain him with a long 
conversation. She should also give him some loving presents, and make an exchange of her own things with 
his, and at the same time should show him her skill in sexual enjoyment. When a courtesan is thus united with 
her lover she should always delight him by affectionate gifts, by conversation, and by the application of tender 
means of enjoyment.'


#27 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:24 AM

OF LIVING LIKE A WIFE 
 
When a courtesan is living as a wife with her lover, she should behave like a chaste woman, and do 
everything to his satisfaction. Her duty in this respect, in short, is, that she should give him pleasure, but 
should not become attached to him, though behaving as if she were really attached. 
Now the following is the manner in which she is to conduct herself, so as to accomplish the above mentioned 
purpose. She should have a mother dependent on her, one who should be represented as very harsh, and who 
looked upon money as her chief object in life. In the event of there being no mother, then an old and 
confidential nurse should play the same role. The mother or nurse, on their part, should appear to be 
displeased with the lover, and forcibly take her away from him. The woman herself should always show 
pretended anger, dejection, fear, and shame on this account, but should not disobey the mother or nurse at any 
time
She should make out to the mother or nurse that the man is suffering from bad health, and making this a 
pretext for going to see him, she should go on that account. She is, moreover, to do the following things for 
the purpose of gaining the man's favour: 
Sending her female attendant to bring the flowers used by him on the previous day, in order that she may use 
them herself as a mark of affection, also asking for the mixture of betel nut and leaves that have remained 
uneaten by him; expressing wonder at his knowledge of sexual intercourse, and the several means of 
enjoyment used by him; learning from him the sixty-four kinds of pleasure mentioned by Babhravya; 
continually practising the ways of enjoyment as taught by him, and according to his liking; keeping his 
secrets; telling him her own desires and secrets; concealing her anger; never neglecting him on the bed when 
he turns his face towards her; touching any parts of his body according to his wish; kissing and embracing him 
when he is asleep; looking at him with apparent anxiety when he is wrapt in thought, or thinking of some 
other subject than herself; showing neither complete shamelessness, nor excessive bashfulness when he meets 
her, or sees her standing on the terrace of her house from the public road; hating his enemies; loving those 
who are dear to him; showing a liking for that which he likes; being in high or low spirits according to the 
state that he is in himself; expressing a curiosity to see his wives; not continuing her anger for a long time; 
suspecting even the marks and wounds made by herself with. her nails and teeth on his body to have been 
made by some other woman; keeping her love for him unexpressed by words, but showing it by deeds, and 
signs, and hints; remaining silent when he is asleep, intoxicated, or sick; being very attentive when he 
describes his good actions, and reciting them afterwards to his praise and benefit; giving witty replies to him if 
he be sufficiently attached to her; listening to all his stories, except those that relate to her rivals; expressing 
feelings of dejection and sorrow if he sighs, yawns, or falls down; pronouncing the words 'live long' when he 
sneezes; pretending to be ill, or to have the desire of pregnancy, when she feels dejected; abstaining from 
praising the good qualities of anybody else, and from censuring those who possess the same faults as her own 
man; wearing anything that may have been given to her by him; abstaining from putting on her ornaments, 
and from taking food when he is in pain, sick, low-spirited, or suffering from misfortune, and condoling and 
lamenting with him over the same; wishing to accompany him if he happens to leave the country himself or if 
he be banished from it by the king; expressing a desire not to live after him; telling him that the whole object 
and desire of her life was to be united with him; offering previously promised sacrifices to the Deity when he 
acquires wealth, or has some desire fulfilled, or when he has recovered from some illness or disease; putting 
on ornaments every day; not acting too freely with him; reciting his name and the name of his family in her 
songs placing his hand on her loins, bosom and forehead, and falling asleep after feeling the pleasure of his 
touch; sitting on his lap and falling asleep there; wishing to have a child by him; desiring not to live longer 
than he does; abstaining from revealing his secrets to others; dissuading him from vows and fasts by saying 
'let the sin fall upon me'; keeping vows and fasts along with him when it is impossible to change his mind on 
the subject; telling him that vows and fasts are difficult to be observed, even by herself, when she has any going to public assemblies without him, and accompanying him when he desires her to do so; taking delight in 
using things previously used by him, and in eating food that he has left uneaten; venerating his family, his 
disposition, his skill in the arts, his learning, his caste, his complexion, his native country, his friends, his good 
qualifies, his age, and his sweet temper; asking him to sing, and to do other such like things, if able to do 
them; going to him without paying any regard to fear, to cold, to heat, or to rain; saying with regard to the 
next world that he should be her lover even there; adapting her tastes, disposition and actions to his liking; 
abstaining from sorcery; disputing continually with her mother on the subject of going to him, and, when 
forcibly taken by her mother to some other place, expressing her desire to die by taking poison, by starving 
herself to death, by stabbing herself with some weapon, or by hanging herself; and lastly assuring the man of 
her constancy and love by means of her agents, and receiving money herself, but abstaining from any dispute 
with her mother with regard to pecuniary matters. 
When the man sets out on a journey, she should make him swear that he will return quickly, and in his 
absence should put aside her vows of worshipping the Deity, and should wear no ornaments except those that 
are lucky. If the time fixed for his return has passed, she should endeavour to ascertain the real time of his 
return from omens, from the reports of the people, and from the positions of the planets, the moon and the 
stars. On occasions of amusement, and of auspicious dreams, she should say 'Let me be soon united to him.' 
If, moreover, she feels melancholy, or sees any inauspicious omen, she should perform some rite to appease 
the Deity. 
When the man does return home she should worship the God Kama', and offer oblations to other Deities, and 
having caused a pot filled with water to be brought by her friends, she should perform the worship in honour 
of the crow who eats the offerings which we make to the manes of deceased relations. After the first visit is 
over she should ask her lover also to perform certain rites, and this he will do if he is sufficiently attached to 
her
Now a man is said to be sufficiently attached to a woman when his love is disinterested; when he has the same 
object in view as his beloved one; when he is quite free from any suspicions on her account; and when he is 
indifferent to money with regard to her. 
Such is the manner of a courtesan living with a man like a wife, and set forth here for the sake of guidance 
from the rules of Dattaka. What is not laid down here should be practised according to the custom of the 
people, and the nature of each individual man. 
There are also two verses on the subject as follows: 
'The extent of the love of women is not known, even to those who are the objects of their affection, on account 
of its subtlety, and on account of the avarice, and natural intelligence of womankind.' 
'Women are hardly ever known in their true light, though they may love men, or become indifferent towards 
them, may give them delight, or abandon them, or may extract from them all the wealth that they may 
possess.'


#28 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:30 AM

ON THE ARTS AND SCIENCES TO BE STUDIED 
 
MAN should study the Kama Sutra and the arts and sciences subordinate thereto, in addition to the study of 
the arts and sciences contained in Dharma and Artha. Even young maids should study this Kama Sutra along 
with its arts and sciences before marriage, and after it they should continue to do so with the consent of their 
husbands
Here some learned men object, and say that females, not being allowed to study any science, should not study 
the Kama Sutra. 
But Vatsyayana is of opinion that this objection does not hold good, for women already know the practice of 
Kama Sutra, and that practice is derived from the Kama Shastra, or the science of Kama itself. Moreover, it is 
not only in this but in many other cases that, though the practice of a science is known to all, only a few 
persons are acquainted with the rules and laws on which the science is based. Thus the Yadnikas or 
sacrificers, though ignorant of grammar, make use of appropriate words when addressing the different Deities, 
and do not know how these words are framed. Again, persons do the duties required of them on auspicious 
days, which are fixed by astrology, though they are not acquainted with the science of astrology. In a like 
manner riders of horses and elephants train these animals without knowing the science of training animals, but 
from practice only. And similarly the people of the most distant provinces obey the laws of the kingdom from 
practice, and because there is a king over them, and without further reason. 1 And from experience we find 
that some women, such as daughters of princes and their ministers, and public women, are actually versed in 
the Kama Shastra. 
A female, therefore, should learn the Kama Shastra, or at least a part of it, by studying its practice from some 
confidential friend. She should study alone in private the sixty-four practices that form a part of the Kama 
Shastra. Her teacher should be one of the following persons: the daughter of a nurse brought up with her and 
already married 2 or a female friend who can be trusted in everything, or the sister of her mother (i.e. her 
aunt), or an old female servant, or a female beggar who may have formerly lived in the family, or her own 
sister who can always be trusted. 
The following are the arts to be studied, together with the Kama Sutra: 
Singing 
Playing on musical instruments 
Dancing 
Union of dancing, singing, and playing instrumental music 
Writing and drawing 
Tattooing 
Arraying and adorning an idol with rice and flowers 
Spreading and arranging beds or couches of flowers, or flowers upon the ground 
Colouring the teeth, garments, hair, nails and bodies, i.e. staining, dyeing, colouring and painting the same 
Fixing stained glass into a floor 
The art of making beds, and spreading out carpets and cushions for reclining 
Playing on musical glasses filled with water 
Storing and accumulating water in aqueducts, cisterns and reservoirs 
Picture making, trimming and decorating 
Stringing of rosaries, necklaces, garlands and wreaths 
Binding of turbans and chaplets, and making crests and top-knots of flowers 
Scenic representations, stage playing Art of making ear ornaments Art of preparing perfumes and odours 
Proper disposition of jewels and decorations, and adornment in dress 
Magic or sorcery 
Quickness of hand or manual skill 
Culinary art, i.e. cooking and cookery 
Making lemonades, sherbets, acidulated drinks, and spirituous extracts with proper flavour and colour 
Tailor's work and sewing 
Making parrots, flowers, tufts, tassels, bunches, bosses, knobs, etc., out of yarn or thread 
Solution of riddles, enigmas, covert speeches, verbal puzzles and enigmatical questions 
A game, which consisted in repeating verses, and as one person finished, another person had to commence at 
once, repeating another verse, beginning with the same letter with which the last speaker's verse ended, 
whoever failed to repeat was considered to have lost, and to be subject to pay a forfeit or stake of some kind 
The art of mimicry or imitation 
Reading, including chanting and intoning 
Study of sentences difficult to pronounce. It is played as a game chiefly by women, and children and consists 
of a difficult sentence being given, and when repeated quickly, the words are often transposed or badly 
pronounced 
Practice with sword, single stick, quarter staff and bow and arrow 
Drawing inferences, reasoning or inferring 
Carpentry, or the work of a carpenter 
Architecture, or the art of building 
Knowledge about gold and silver coins, and jewels and gems 
Chemistry and mineralogy 
Colouring jewels, gems and beads 
Knowledge of mines and quarries 
Gardening; knowledge of treating the diseases of trees and plants, of nourishing them, and determining their 
ages 
Art of cock fighting, quail fighting and ram fighting 
Art of teaching parrots and starlings to speak 
Art of applying perfumed ointments to the body, and of dressing the hair with unguents and perfumes and 
braiding it 
The art of understanding writing in cypher, and the writing of words in a peculiar way 
The art of speaking by changing the forms of words. It is of various kinds. Some speak by changing the 
beginning and end of words, others by adding unnecessary letters between every syllable of a word, and so on 
Knowledge of language and of the vernacular dialects 
Art of making flower carriages 
Art of framing mystical diagrams, of addressing spells and charms, and binding armlets 
Mental exercises, such as completing stanzas or verses on receiving a part of them; or supplying one, two or 
three lines when the remaining lines are given indiscriminately from different verses, so as to make the whole 
an entire verse with regard to its meaning; or arranging the words of a verse written irregularly by separating 
the vowels from the consonants, or leaving them out altogether; or putting into verse or prose sentences 
represented by signs or symbols. There are many other such exercises. 
Composing poems 
Knowledge of dictionaries and vocabularies 
Knowledge of ways of changing and disguising the appearance of persons 
Knowledge of the art of changing the appearance of things, such as making cotton to appear as silk, coarse 
and common things to appear as fine and good 
Various ways of gambling 
Art of obtaining possession of the property of others by means of muntras or incantations 
Skill in youthful sports 
Knowledge of the rules of society, and of how to pay respect and compliments to others 
Knowledge of the art of war, of arms, of armies, etc. 
Knowledge of gymnastics 
Art of knowing the character of a man from his features 
Knowledge of scanning or constructing verses 
Arithmetical recreations 
Making artificial flowers 
Making figures and images in clay 
A public woman, endowed with a good disposition, beauty and other winning qualities, and also versed in the 
above arts, obtains the name of a Ganika, or public woman of high quality, and receives a seat of honour in an 
assemblage of men. She is, moreover, always respected by the king, and praised by learned men, and her 
favour being sought for by all, she becomes an object of universal regard. The daughter of a king too as well 
as the daughter of a minister, being learned in the above arts, can make their husbands favourable to them, 
even though these may have thousands of other wives besides themselves. And in the same manner, if a wife 
becomes separated from her husband, and falls into distress, she can support herself easily, even in a foreign 
country, by means of her knowledge of these arts. Even the bare knowledge of them gives attractiveness to a 
woman, though the practice of them may be only possible or otherwise according to the circumstances of each 
case. A man who is versed in these arts, who is loquacious and acquainted with the arts of gallantry, gains 
very soon the hearts of women, even though he is only acquainted with them for a short time.


#29 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:32 AM

THE LIFE OF A CITIZEN 
 
HAVING thus acquired learning, a man, with the wealth that he may have gained by gift, conquest, purchase, 
deposit, or inheritance from his ancestors, should become a householder, and pass the life of a citizen. He 
should take a house in a city, or large village, or in the vicinity of good men, or in a place which is the resort 
of many persons. This abode should be situated near some water, and divided into different compartments for 
different purposes. It should be surrounded by a garden, and also contain two rooms, an outer and an inner 
one. The inner room should be occupied by the females, while the outer room, balmy with rich perfumes, 
should contain a bed, soft, agreeable to the sight, covered with a clean white cloth, low in the middle part, 
having garlands and bunches of flowers upon it, and a canopy above it, and two pillows, one at the top, 
another at the bottom. There should be also a sort of couch besides, and at the head of this a sort of stool, on 
which should be placed the fragrant ointments for the night, as well as flowers, pots containing collyrium and 
other fragrant substances, things used for perfuming the mouth, and the bark of the common citron tree. Near 
the couch, on the ground, there should be a pot for spitting, a box containing ornaments, and also a lute 
hanging from a peg made of the tooth of an elephant, a board for drawing, a pot containing perfume, some 
books, and some garlands of the yellow amaranth flowers. Not far from the couch, and on the ground, there 
should be a round seat, a toy cart, and a board for playing with dice; outside the outer room there should be 
cages of birds, and a separate place for spinning, carving and such like diversions. In the garden there should 
be a whirling swing and a common swing, as also a bower of creepers covered with flowers, in which a raised 
parterre should be made for sitting. 
Now the householder, having got up in the morning and performed his necessary duties, should wash his 
teeth, apply a limited quantity of ointments and perfumes to his body, put some ornaments on his person and 
collyrium on his eyelids and below his eyes, colour his lips with alacktaka, and look at himself in the glass. 
Having then eaten betel leaves, with other things that give fragrance to the mouth, he should perform his usual 
business. He should bathe daily, anoint his body with oil every other day, apply a lathering substance 7 to his 
body every three days, get his head (including face) shaved every four days and the other parts of his body 
every five or ten days. All these things should be done without fail, and the sweat of the armpits should also 
be removed. Meals should be taken in the forenoon, in the afternoon, and again at night, according to 
Charayana. After breakfast, parrots and other birds should be taught to speak, and the fighting of cocks, 
quails, and rams should follow. A limited time should be devoted to diversions with Pithamardas, Vitas, and 
Vidushakas, and then should be taken the midday sleep. After this the householder, having put on his 
clothes and ornaments, should, during the afternoon, converse with his friends. In the evening there should be 
singing, and after that the householder, along with his friend, should await in his room, previously decorated 
and perfumed, the arrival of the woman that may be attached to him, or he may send a female messenger for 
her, or go for her himself. After her arrival at his house, he and his friend should welcome her, and entertain 
her with a loving and agreeable conversation. Thus end the duties of the day. 
The following are the things to be done occasionally as diversions or amusements: 
Holding festivals 11 in honour of different Deities 
Social gatherings of both sexes 
Drinking parties 
Picnics 
Other social diversions 
Festivals 
On some particular auspicious day, an assembly of citizens should be convened in the temple of Saraswati. 12 
There the skill of singers, and of others who may have come recently to the town, should be tested, and on the 
following day they should always be given some rewards. After that they may either be retained or dismissed, 
according as their performances are liked or not by the assembly. The members of the assembly should act in 
concert, both in times of distress as well as in times of prosperity, and it is also the duty of these citizens to 
show hospitality to strangers who may have come to the assembly. What is said above should be understood 
to apply to all the other festivals which may be held in honour of the different Deities, according to the present 
rules. 
Social Gatherings 
When men of the same age, disposition and talents, fond of the same diversions and with the same degree of 
education, sit together in company with public women, 13 or in an assembly of citizens, or at the abode of one 
among themselves, and engage in agreeable discourse with each other, such is called a Sitting in company or a 
social gathering. The subjects of discourse are to be the completion of verses half composed by others, and the 
testing the knowledge of one another in the various arts. The women who may be the most beautiful, who may 
like the same things that the men like, and who may have power to attract the minds of others, are here done 
homage to. 
Drinking Parties 
Men and women should drink in one another's houses. And here the men should cause the public women to 
drink, and should then drink themselves, liquors such as the Madhu, Aireya, Sara and Asawa, which are of 
bitter and sour taste; also drinks concocted from the barks of various trees, wild fruits and leaves. 
Going to Gardens or Picnics 
In the forenoon, men having dressed themselves should go to gardens on horseback, accompanied by public 
women and followed by servants. And having done there all the duties of the day, and passed the time in 
various agreeable diversions, such as the fighting of quails, cocks and rams, and other spectacles, they should 
return home in the afternoon in the same manner, bringing with them bunches of flowers, etc. 
The same also applies to bathing in summer in water from which wicked or dangerous animals have 
previously been taken out, and which has been built in on all sides. 
Other Social Diversions 
Spending nights playing with dice. Going out on moonlight nights. Keeping the festive day in honour of 
spring. Plucking the sprouts and fruits of the mango trees. Eating the fibres of lotuses. Eating the tender ears 
of corn. Picnicing in the forests when the trees get their new foliage. The Udakakashvedika or sporting in the 
water. Decorating each other with the flowers of some trees. Pelting each other with the flowers of the 
Kadamba tree, and many other sports which may either be known to the whole country, or may be peculiar to 
particular parts of it. These and similar other amusements should always be carried on by citizens. 
The above amusements should be followed by a person who diverts himself alone in company with a 
courtesan, as well as by a courtesan who can do the same in company with her maid servants or with citizens. 
A Pithamarda is a man without wealth, alone in the world, whose only property consists of his Mallika, 15 
some lathering substance and a red cloth, who comes from a good country, and who is skilled in all the arts; 
and by teaching these arts is received in the company of citizens, and in the abode of public women. 
A Vita is a man who has enjoyed the pleasures of fortune, who is a compatriot of the citizens with whom 
he associates, who is possessed of the qualities of a houseliolder, who has his wife with him, and who is 
honoured in the assembly of citizens and in the abodes of public women, and lives on their means and on 
them. A Vidushaka (also called a Vaihasaka, i.e. one who provokes laughter) is a person only acquainted 
with some of the arts, who is a jester, and who is trusted by all. 
These persons are employed in matters of quarrels and reconciliations between citizens and public women. 
This remark applies also to female beggars, to women with their heads shaved, to adulterous women, and to 
public women skilled in all the various arts. 
Thus a citizen living in his town or village, respected by all, should call on the persons of his own caste who 
may be worth knowing. He should converse in company and gratify his friends by his society, and obliging 
others by his assistance in various matters, he should cause them to assist one another in the same way. 
There are some verses on this subject as follows: 
'A citizen discoursing, not entirely in the Sanscrit language, 18 nor wholly in the dialects of the country, on 
various topics in society, obtains great respect. The wise should not resort to a society disliked by the public, 
governed by no rules, and intent on the destruction of others. But a learned man living in a society which acts 
according to the wishes of the people, and which has pleasure for its only object is highly respected in this 
world.


#30 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:35 AM

ABOUT THE KINDS OF WOMEN RESORTED TO BY THE CITIZENS, AND OF FRIENDS AND 
MESSENGERS
 

When the Kama is practised by men of the four castes according to the rules of the Holy Writ (i.e. by lawful marriage

) with virgins of their own caste, it then becomes a means of acquiring lawful progeny and good 
fame, and it is not also opposed to the customs of the world. On the contrary the practice of Kama with 
women of the higher castes, and with those previously enjoyed by others, even though they be of the same 
caste, is prohibited. But the practice of Kama with women of the lower castes, with women excommunicated 
from their own caste, with public women, and with women twice married, 1 is neither enjoined nor prohibited. 
The object of practising Kama with such women is pleasure only. 
Nayikas, therefore, are of three kinds, viz. maids, women twice married, and public women. Gonikaputra 
has expressed an opinion that there is a fourth kind of Nayika, viz. a woman who is resorted to on some 
special occasion even though she be previously married to another. These special occasions are when a man 
thinks thus: 
This woman is self-willed, and has been previously enjoyed by many others besides myself. I may, therefore, 
safely resort to her as to a public woman though she belongs to a higher caste than mine, and, in so doing, I 
shall not be violating the ordinances of Dharma. 
Or thus: 
This is a twice-married woman and has been enjoyed by others before me; there is, therefore, no objection to 
my resorting to her. 
Or thus: 
This woman has gained the heart of her great and powerful husband, and exercises a mastery over him, who is 
a friend of my enemy; if, therefore, she becomes united with me she will cause her husband to abandon my 
enemy. 
Or thus: 
This woman will turn the mind of her husband, who is very powerful, in my favour, he being at present 
disaffected towards me, and intent on doing me some harm. 
Or thus: 
By making this woman my friend I shall gain the object of some friend of mine, or shall be able to effect the 
ruin of some enemy, or shall accomplish some other difficult purpose. 
Or thus: 
By being united with this woman, I shall kill her husband, and so obtain his vast riches which I covet. 
Or thus: 
The union of this woman with me is not attended with any danger, and will bring me wealth, of which, on 
account of my poverty and inability to support myself, I am very much in need. I shall therefore obtain her 
vast riches in this way without any difficulty. 
Or thus: 
This woman loves me ardently, and knows all my weak points; if therefore, I am unwilling to be united with 
her, she will make my faults public, and thus tarnish my character and reputation. Or she will bring some 
gross accusation against me, of which it may be hard to clear myself, and I shall be ruined. Or perhaps she 
will detach from me her husband who is powerful, and yet under her control, and will unite him to my enemy, 
or will herself join the latter. 
Or thus: 
The husband of this woman has violated the chastity of my wives, I shall therefore return that injury by 
seducing his wives. 
Or thus: 
By the help of this woman I shall kill an enemy of the king, who has taken shelter with her, and whom I am 
ordered by the king to destroy. 
Or thus: 
The woman whom I love is under the control of this woman. I shall, through the influence of the latter, be able 
to get at the former. 
Or thus: 
This woman will bring to me a maid, who possesses wealth and beauty, but who is hard to get at, and under 
the control of another. 
Or lastly thus: 
My enemy is a friend of this woman's husband, I shall therefore cause her to join him, and will thus create an 
enmity between her husband and him. 
For these and similar other reasons the wives of other men may be resorted to, but it must be distinctly 
understood that is only allowed for special reasons, and not for mere carnal desire. 
Charayana thinks that under these circumstances there is also a fifth kind of Nayika, viz. a woman who is kept 
by a minister, or who repairs to him occasionally; or a widow who accomplishes the purpose of a man with 
the person to whom she resorts. 
Suvarnanabha adds that a woman who passes the life of an ascetic and in the condition of a widow may be 
considered as a sixth kind of Nayika. 
Ghotakamukha says that the daughter of a public woman, and a female servant, who are still virgins, form a 
seventh kind of Nayika. 
Gonardiya puts forth his doctrine that any woman born of good family, after she has come of age, is an eighth 
kind of Nayika. 
But these four latter kinds of Nayikas do not differ much from the first four kinds of them, as there is no 
separate object in resorting to them. Therefore, Vatsyayana is of opinion that there are only four kinds of 
Nayikas, i.e. the maid, the twice-married woman, the public woman, and the woman resorted to for a special purpose. 
The following women are not to be enjoyed: 
A leper 
A lunatic 
A woman turned out of caste 
A woman who reveals secrets 
A woman who publicly expresses desire for sexual intercourse 
A woman who is extremely white 
A woman who is extremely black 
A bad-smelling woman 
A woman who is a near relation 
A woman who is a female friend 
A woman who leads the life of an ascetic 
And, lastly the wife of a relation, of a friend, of a learned Brahman, and of the king 
The followers of Babhravya say that any woman who has been enjoyed by five men is a fit and proper person 
to be enjoyed. But Gonikaputra is of opinion that even when this is the case, the wives of a relation, of a 
learned Brahman and of a king should be excepted. 
The following are of the kind of friends: 
One who has played with you in the dust, i.e. in childhood 
One who is bound by an obligation 
One who is of the same disposition and fond of the same things 
One who is a fellow student 
One who is acquainted with your secrets and faults, and whose faults and secrets are also known to you 
One who is a child of your nurse 
One who is brought up with you one who is an hereditary friend 
Charayana says that citizens form friendship with washermen, barbers, cowherds, florists, druggists, betel-leaf 
sellers, tavern keepers, beggars, Pithamardas, Vitas and Vidushekas, as also with the wives of all these people. 
A messenger should possess the following qualities: 
Skilfulness 
Boldness 
Knowledge of the intention of men by their outward signs 
Absence of confusion, i.e. no shyness 
Knowledge of the exact meaning of what others do or say 
Good manners 
Knowledge of appropriate times and places for doing different things 
Ingenuity in business 
Quick comprehension 
Quick application of remedies, i.e. quick and ready resources 
And this part ends with a verse: 
'The man who is ingenious and wise, who is accompanied by a friend, and who knows the intentions of others, 
as also the proper time and place for doing everything, can gain over, very easily, even a woman who is very 
hard to be obtained.'


#31 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 03:38 AM

KINDS OF SEXUAL UNION ACCORDING TO DIMENSIONS, FORCE OF DESIRE OR PASSION, 
TIME
 
 

MAN is divided into three classes, viz. the hare man, the bull man, and the horse man, according to the size of his

lingam. 
A woman also, according to the depth of her yoni, is either a female deer, a mare, or a female elephant. 
There are thus three equal unions between persons of corresponding dimensions, and there are six unequal 
unions, when the dimensions do not correspond, or nine in all, as the following table shows: 
Hare 
Deer 
Hare 
Mare 
Bull 
Mare 
Hare 
Elephant 
Horse 
Elephant 
Bull 
Deer 
 
Bull 
Elephant 
Horse 
Deer 
Horse 
Mare 
In these unequal unions, when the male exceeds the female in point of size, his union with a woman who is 
immediately next to him in size is called high union, and is of two kinds; while his union with the woman 
most remote from his size is called the highest union, and is of one kind only. On the other hand, when the 
female exceeds the male in point of size, her union with a man immediately next to her in size is called low 
union, and is of two kinds; while her union with a man most remote from her in size is called the lowest 
union, and is of one kind only. 
In other words, the horse and mare, the bull and deer, form the high union, while the horse and deer form the 
highest union. On the female side, the elephant and bull, the mare and hare, form low unions, while the 
elephant has and the hare make the lowest unions. There are, then, nine kinds of union according to 
dimensions. Amongst all these, equal unions are the best, those of a superlative degree, i.e. the highest and the 
lowest, are the worst, and the rest are middling, and with them the higher ones are better than the low. 
There are also nine kinds of union according to the force of passion or carnal desire, as follows: 
Small 
Small 
Small 
Middling 
Middling 
Middling 
Small 
Intense 
Intense 
Intense 
Middling 
Small 
Middling 
Intense 
Intense 
Small 
Intense 
 
A man is called a man of small passion whose desire at the time of sexual union is not great, whose semen is 
scanty, and who cannot bear the warm embraces of the female. 
Those who differ from this temperament are called men of middling passion, while those of intense passion 
are full of desire. 
In the same way, women are supposed to have the three degrees of feeling as specified above. 
Lastly, according to time there are three kinds of men and women, the short-timed, the moderate-timed, and 
the long-timed; and of these, as in the previous statements, there are nine kinds of union. 
But on this last head there is a difference of opinion about the female, which should be stated. 
Auddalika says, 'Females do not emit as males do. The males simply remove their desire, while the females, 
from their consciousness of desire, feel a certain kind of pleasure, which gives them satisfaction, but it is 
impossible for them to tell you what kind of pleasure they feel. The fact from which this becomes evident is, 
that males, when engaged in coition, cease of themselves after emission, and are satisfied, but it is not so with 
females.' 
This opinion is however objected to on the grounds that, if a male be a long-timed, the female loves him the 
more, but if he be short-timed, she is dissatisfied with him. And this circumstance, some say, would prove that 
the female emits also. 
But this opinion does not hold good, for if it takes a long time to allay a woman's desire, and during this time 
she is enjoying great pleasure, it is quite natural then that she should wish for its continuation. And on this 
subject there is a verse as follows: 
'By union with men the lust, desire, or passion of women is satisfied, and the pleasure derived from the 
consciousness of it is called their satisfaction.' 
The followers of Babhravya, however, say that the semen of women continues to fall from the beginning of 
the sexual union to its end, and it is right that it should be so, for if they had no semen there would be no 
embryo
To this there is an objection. In the beginning of coition the passion of the woman is middling, and she cannot 
bear the vigorous thrusts of her lover, but by degrees her passion increases until she ceases to think about her 
body, and then finally she wishes to stop from further coition. 
This objection, however, does not hold good, for even in ordinary things that revolve with great force, such as 
a potter's wheel, or a top, we find that the motion at first is slow, but by degrees it becomes very rapid. In the 
same way the passion of the woman having gradually increased, she has a desire to discontinue coition, when 
all the semen has fallen away. And there is a verse with regard to this as follows: 
'The fall of the semen of the man takes place only at the end of coition, while the semen of the woman falls 
continually, and after the semen of both has all fallen away then they wish for the discontinuance of coition.' 2 
Lastly, Vatsyayana is of opinion that the semen of the female falls in the same way as that of the male. 
Now some may ask here: If men and women are beings of the same kind, and are engaged in bringing about 
the same results, why should they have different works to do? 
Vatsya says that this is so, because the ways of working as well as the consciousness of pleasure in men and 
women are different. The difference in the ways of working, by which men are the actors, and women are the 
persons acted upon, is owing to the nature of the male and the female, otherwise the actor would be 
sometimes the person acted upon, and vice versa. And from this difference in the ways of working follows the 
difference in the consciousness of pleasure, for a man thinks, 'this woman is united with me', and a woman 
thinks, 'I am united with this man'. 
It may be said that, if the ways of working in men and women are different, why should not there be a 
difference, even in the pleasure they feel, and which is the result of those ways. 
But this objection is groundless, for, the person acting and the person acted upon being of different kinds, 
there is a reason for the difference in their ways of working; but there is no reason for any difference in the 
pleasure they feel, because they both naturally derive pleasure from the act they perform. 
On this again some may say that when different persons are engaged in doing the same work, we find that 
they accomplish the same end or purpose; while, on the contrary, in the case of men and women we find that 
each of them accomplishes his or her own end separately, and this is inconsistent. But this is a mistake, for we 
find that sometimes two things are done at the same time, as for instance in the fighting of rams, both the rams 
receive the shock at the same time on their heads. Again, in throwing one wood apple against another, and 
also in a fight or struggle of wrestlers. If it be said that in these cases the things employed are of the same 
kind, it is answered that even in the case of men and women, the nature of the two persons is the same. And as 
the difference in their ways of working arises from the difference of their conformation only, it follows that 
men experience the same kind of pleasure as women do. 
There is also a verse on this subject as follows: 
'Men and women, being of the same nature, feel the same kind of pleasure, and therefore a man should marry 
such a woman as will love him ever afterwards.' 
The pleasure of men and women being thus proved to be of the same kind, it follows that, in regard to time, 
there are nine kinds of sexual intercourse, in the same way as there are nine kinds, according to the force of 
passion
There being thus nine kinds of union with regard to dimensions, force of passion, and time, respectively, by 
making combinations of them, innumerable kinds of union would be produced. Therefore in each particular 
kind of sexual union, men should use such means as they may think suitable for the occasion. 4 
At the first time of sexual union the passion of the male is intense, and his time is short, but in subsequent 
unions on the same day the reverse of this is the case. With the female, however, it is the contrary, for at the 
first time her passion is weak, and then her time long, but on subsequent occasions on the same day, her 
passion is intense and her time short, until her passion is satisfied. 
On the different Kind of Love 
Men learned in the humanities are of opinion that love is of four kinds: 
Love acquired by continual habit 
Love resulting from the imagination 
Love resulting from belief 
Love resulting from the perception of external objects 
Love resulting from the constant and continual performance of some act is called love acquired by constant 
practice and habit, as for instance the love of sexual intercourse, the love of hunting, the love of drinking, the 
love of gambling, etc., etc. 
Love which is felt for things to which we are not habituated, and which proceeds entirely from ideas, is called 
love resulting from imagination, as for instance that love which some men and women and eunuchs feel for 
the Auparishtaka or mouth congress, and that which is felt by all for such things as embracing, kissing, etc., 
etc. 
The love which is mutual on both sides, and proved to be true, when each looks upon the other as his or her 
very own, such is called love resulting from belief by the learned. 
The love resulting from the perception of external objects is quite evident and well known to the world. 
because the pleasure which it affords is superior to the pleasure of the other kinds of love, which exists only 
for its sake. 
What has been said in this chapter upon the subject of sexual union is sufficient for the learned; but for the 
edification of the ignorant, the same will now be treated of at length and in detail.
 
 
The 3 types of women according to the Kamasutra
 
The Kamasutra classified women into three types which gives the names of animals, Female deer(DOE), elephant woman and horsewoman(MARE).
 
The deer would be one woman whose vagina (yoni) is about 6 fingers deep; remember that these are measures of the time. Physically the woman doe has a delicate, childish features, small head, dark eyes, thick curly hair. According to the Kamasutra, a woman has such thick legs, especially thighs and arms rounded. As a personality trait emphasized that women doe is affectionate but jealous.
 
Women mare or horsewoman has a depth of 9 vaginal fingers, the Kamasutra describes her physical appearance has highlighted that wide hips, big breasts and thick arms.
This kind of woman loves food and is very sleepy but be very affectionate with men.
 
The elephant woman has a vagina that measures 12 fingers deep, the Kamasutra is described as a black-haired woman with plump cheeks, thick lips, nose and long ears and thick. This kind of woman would be short arms with hands and feet round or approximate to that form. In this case, it highlights that women elephant would have trouble achieving orgasm.
 
 
 
The three types of Kamasutra men 
 
* Hare Man, in this type of man’s penis the erection would be about 6 fingers (measured at the time) and corresponds to a person of short stature, thighs, knees, feet and hands small but provided with the rest of the body. According to the Kamasutra hare, man would have a rounded face with large eyes and small teeth. The personality would be that of a man who acts calmly and moderately but in the background is very ambitious.
 
* The bull-man, the penis in erection as measured is 9 fingers and the Kama Sutra is a big man, robust wide chest and abdomen flat. The face would stand out a broad forehead and large eyes. Bull man’s personality is characterized by anxiety, irritability and a violent temper.
 
* The horseman, the erect penis would have a measure of 12 fingers, according to Kamasutra physically be tall, athletic, muscular, hands and feet long and big teeth. The man’s personality would be a passionate but lazy horse; women who attract this type are those of large and robust.


#32 AnnikaDevi

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 04:47 AM



You know what? You remind me someone... Better use a fax next time.

There is a reason behind it. KAMASUTRA is written by a MALE author, so it feels like a MALE DOMINATED book, and yes it is true. The era when VATSAYANA lived around 2nd century BC, please don't confuse him with Pakṣilasvāmin Vātsyāyana, the author of Nyāya Sutra Bhāshya. It is believed that he must have lived between the 1st and 6th century AD, on the following grounds: He mentions that Satakarni Satavahana, a king of Kuntal, killed Malayevati his wife with an instrument called Katamari by striking her in the passion of love. Vatsyayana quotes this case to warn people of the danger arising from some old customs of striking women when under the influence of sexual passion. This king of Kuntal is believed to have lived and reigned during the 1st century AD, and consequently, Vatsyayana must have lived after him. On the other hand, another author, Varahamihira, in the eighteenth chapter of his "Brihatsanhita", discusses the science of love and appears to have borrowed largely from Vatsyayana on the subject. Varahamihira is believed to have lived during the 6th century, and therefore Vatsyayana must have written his works before the 6th century. People in those days were tribals, they were following old customs related to sex, VATSAYANA tried to change it. He tried to modernise it. 

Women in those days hardly wore clothes and roamed about virtually naked and it was acceptable in those days, there were no laws and regulations in place as were today. They followed the VEDAS as the only book for guidance. So SEX was a wild thing, there were no well chalked for these men & women to guide them how to do SEX. To educate them and make SEX interesting for the people VATSAYANA had to explain it in minute details so that TRIBAL people could grasp what he wanted to say, especially men. Why men? Why not women? The reason is VEDAS give high importance to GODS and all GODS are men so women were not much of an importance, which can be very well seen when you read the above posts. Only prostitutes were given importance because they were loved and admired by MEN, so these girls made it to the pages of Kamasutra. 

 

Some sculptures depicting WOMEN in the 2nd CENTURY INDIA when KAMASUTRA was written

 

 

4AMz8A9.jpg

 

 





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Kamasutra, Sex, Erotic, Fuck, Sexpositions, sexual intercourse, Coitus, Lovemaking, Carnal Knowledge, Copulation

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